Event trigger.png We are conducting a survey to learn how we can improve the Paradox Wikis experience for our users. Please take the time to fill the Survey Event trigger.png

Domestic Economy interface

From Europa Universalis 3 Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This article is accurate for the latest versions of EU3, Napoleon’s Ambition, In Nomine, Heir to the Throne and Divine Wind.

The Domestic Economy interface overview for Austria at the start of the War of the League of Cambrai in DW 5.1.

The economy tab controls the economy of the nation and is the third tab in the Domestic Management interface. The national economy and government budgets are detailed on the left hand side of the tab while the controlling inputs are on the right.

National Economy

Monthly Income

A nation’s monthly income is determined by the following distinct economic sub-systems:

Investments

The amount of money a nation can invest is a direct result of monthly income and occurs on a monthly basis. Investments can never exceed total income. The desitnation of the investments is selected by mocing the sliders on the right hand side of the tab. Clicking the arrow on the far right will spend 200Ducats.png and return a 100Ducats.png investment in that research area. This income can be invested in one of three areas:

Government Budget

Fixed Expenses

In a very confusing game design decision, despite being shown below monthly income, expenses are actually not related. Monthly income has no bearing on expenses. Fixed expenses are instead deducted from annual income (described below) on a monthly basis. There are a total of five forms of self-explanatory expenses:

War Taxes

War taxes are a measure used by nations to allow them to spend more money during a war. War taxes increase the war exhaustion each month and are automatically turned off when a war ends.

Loans

Any nation can take a loan (using the take loan button) if it runs out of cash, with the loan amount added directly into the treasury (e.g. part of annual income for that year). The loan period is always 5 years, at which point reimbursement will be due.

See also